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I've seen a couple of legal questions (mostly related to copyright) on this site, none of which specifies the jurisdiction they ask about. Since even basic concepts about copyright have vast differences in different jurisdiction, such questions cannot be answered. All answers I've read so far implicitly assume one jurisdiction, usually US jurisdiction. What are we supposed to do with this kind of question?

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I would recommend that these be included in posts, but I wouldn't require it.

If you feel that the jurisdiction is important, downvote, and leave a comment for the author to make note of the jurisdiction in cases where you think it would be necessary.

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    Jurisdiction is always necessary with legal questions. There is no such thing as “universal legal concept.” Each jurisdiction has subtle differences and saying “jurisdiction is unimportant” is just ignorant. – FUZxxl Jan 23 '16 at 14:06
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    @FUZxxl I definitely understand where you are coming from here - and I am definitely not saying that jurisdictions are unimportant here. But I'm not sure how we would require the inclusion of jurisdiction in a question or answer. – Zizouz212 Jan 23 '16 at 14:09
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    If the question is a legal question (and that is the prerequisite of this meta post) then jurisdiction is always important and must be specified. There is not a single legal question where jurisdiction is unimportant. A legal question that lacks jurisdiction lacks critical information required to write an answer and cannot be answered at all. Therefore I'm asking what to do. – FUZxxl Jan 23 '16 at 14:12
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    I'm also a little bit dumbfounded as to what to do as well. Pure legal questions can be asked at Law Stack Exchange, but for the legal questions that reside here, there's nothing that we can do. We could close vote and out a question on hold as Unclear what you're asking, but that's as much as I can imagine. Do you have any other ideas? – Zizouz212 Jan 23 '16 at 14:15
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    A decision / consensus that legal questions must specify a jurisdiction (and exactly one jurisdiction) would help so it's easy to close a question / demand more information without further discussion. On Stack Overflow, a similar thing was decided wrt. programming languages: A question may not say “C/C++/Java/Pascal is fine,” questions that ask for how to do something must specify one and only one programming language. This is to force questions to say what they actually need instead of where they expect to get the largest audience. – FUZxxl Jan 23 '16 at 14:19
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    @FUZxxl Sounds food. Let's wait to see what the rest of the community thinks. :) – Zizouz212 Jan 23 '16 at 14:20

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